Category Archives: SDN

It’s a Switch! It’s a Router! It’s a Server! It’s a new product platform – NFX250

Today marks a very special day for me at Juniper. A brand new product line that I’ve managed from the very beginning has been announced. The NFX250 is a unique platform that actualizes the concepts of Network Functions Virtualization we’ve all heard so much about, but hardly see encompassed in an end-to-end solution. The NFX250 is a Distributed Cloud CPE that Managed Services Providers (MSPs) and Distributed Enterprises can use to dramatically reduce the time and cost to deploy network functions to sites.

Previously, MSPs would offer services by performing a truck roll of appliances, such as firewalls, routers, WAN Optimizers, Analytics Engines, WLAN Controllers, etc to their customers’ sites. This would take months, if not years, for several reasons: the appliances would need to be stocked at the distribution centers of the MSP, manually configured, and then shipped to each site, often in the hundreds or thousands. This would also be a highly complex series of operations prone to errors. At the sites, the appliances, each with their unique requirements, would need to be physically cabled and hard-chained. It also meant that if an end customer was not satisfied with a particular vendor, and had hundreds or thousands of sites, they were stuck because of they locked in.

Enter the NFX250, which leverages x86 chipset and virtualization technologies in addition to best-in-class switching performance from Juniper. Now all these functions can be consolidate on to a single hardware platform. With a 6-core Xeon-D processor, the NFX250 platform is able to consolidate up to 8 services Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) simultaneously. With a dedicated Packet Forwarding Engine (PFE) in the Data Path, it is also able to provide wire-speed switching on 10 LAN ports.

As I mentioned, the NFX250 is part of an end-to-end solution, in which Contrail Service Orchestration takes the center stage. A customer can activate the CPE by simply connecting to the Network Service Activator component of Contrail Service Orchestration. This ensures that the CPE downloads its image and configuration in a secure manner. It makes use of a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip to verify that the CPE left the factory and reached the customer without being tampered with. Moreover, it blocks BIOS implants by running checks on the BIOS and by ensuring that the CPE boots with an image that wasn’t modified.

Contrail Service Orchestration handles the VNF lifecycle management. With a Network Service Designer application for network architects to define services, and separate Administrator and Customer Self-Service portals for selecting services, the end-to-end solution offers simple, secure, and flexible means to deploy functions within minutes.

I truly believe this CPE will revolutionize the industry for Managed Service Providers as well as large to mid-sized Enterprises. What I find especially incredible is the frenetic pace of innovation at Juniper. I write these words less than a year after I joined the company, during which time I have brought this hardware platform from pre-concept to market. It has been a crazy hectic year for me with a bright horizon and packed roadmap ahead. I am extremely proud to have been behind the wheel of the NFX250.

Head End Replication and VXLAN Compliance

Arista Networks recently announced that its implementation of VXLAN no longer requires IP Multicast in the underlay network. Instead, the implementation will now rely on a technique called Head End Replication to forward BUM (Broadcast, Unknown Unicast, and Multicast) traffic in the VLANs that it transports. But first, let’s rewind to the original VXLAN specification.

Virtual eXtensible Local Area Networks were first defined in an Internet draft called draft-mahalingam-dutt-dcops-vxlan-00.txt in August 2011. It took some time for switch vendors to implement it, but now Broadcom’s Trident II supports it. Of course, software overlay solutions such as VMware NSX and Nuage Virtualized Services Platform (VSP) also implement it. Three years later, in August 2014, this draft became RFC 7348. The draft had 9 revisions to it, so it went up to draft-mahalingam-dutt-dcops-vxlan-09.txt, but there are no significant changes with respect to Multicast requirements in the underlay. They all say the same thing in section 4.2:

Consider the VM on the source host attempting to communicate with the destination VM using IP.  Assuming that they are both on the same subnet, the VM sends out an Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) broadcast frame. In the non-VXLAN environment, this frame would be sent out using MAC broadcast across all switches carrying that VLAN.

With VXLAN, a header including the VXLAN VNI is inserted at the beginning of the packet along with the IP header and UDP header. However, this broadcast packet is sent out to the IP multicast group on which that VXLAN overlay network is realized. To effect this, we need to have a mapping between the VXLAN VNI and the IP multicast group that it will use.

In essence, IP multicast is the control plane in VXLAN. But, as we know, IP multicast is very complex to configure and manage.

In June 2013, Cisco deviated from the VXLAN standard in the Nexus 1000V in two ways:

  1. It makes copies of packets for each possible IP address at which the destination MAC address can be found, and sent from the head-end of the VXLAN tunnel, or VLAN Tunnel End Point (VTEP). Then these packets are unicast to all VMs within the VXLAN segment, thereby precluding the need to have IP multicast in the core of the network.
  2. The Virtual Supervisor Module (VSM) of the Nexus 1000V acts as the control plane by maintaining the MAC address table of the VMs, which it then distributes, via a proprietary signaling protocol, to the Virtual Ethernet Module (VEM), which, in turn, acts as the data plane in the Nexus 1000V.

To their credit Cisco acknowledged that this mode is not compliant with the standard, although they do support a multicast-mode configuration as well. At that time they expressed hope that the rest of the industry would back their solution. Well, the RFC still states that an IP multicast backbone is needed.

This brings me to the original announcement from Arista. They claim in their press statementThe Arista VXLAN implementation is truly open and standards based with the ability to interoperate with a wide range of data center switches.

But nowhere else on their website do they state how they actually adhere to the standard. Cisco breaks the standard by conducting Head End Replication. Adam Raffe does a great job in explaining how this works (basically, the source VTEP will replicate the Broadcast or Multicast packet and send to all VMs in the same VXLAN). Arista should explain how exactly their enhanced implementation works.

Harnessing the Raw Performance of x86 – Snabb Switch

Recently I was listening to an episode of Ivan Pepeljnak’s Software Gone Wild podcast featuring Snabb Switch that inspired me to write this post. Snabb Switch is an open source program, developed by Luke Gorrie, for processing virtualized Ethernet traffic for white field deployments using x86 hardware. It caught my attention because the recent announcements of Intel’s networking capabilities at IDF14 were fresh in my mind. Snabb Switch is a networking framework that also defines different building blocks for I/O (such as input/Rx links and output/Tx links), Ethernet interfaces, and packet processing elements leveraging x86 servers and Intel NICs. It speaks natively to Ethernet hardware, Hypervisors, and the Linux kernel by virtue of a user-space executable. The cornerstone of Snabb Switch is its super light footprint, which enables it to process tens of millions of ethernet packets per second per core. Moreover, it has been known to push 200 Gbps on an x86 server. Pretty impressive for an open source program.

Snabb Switch uses the Lua programming language, which is a lightweight scripting language that can make some function calls and change the configuration in real time. It leverages LuaJit, a Just-In-Time compiler that compiles Lua code for x86 in real-time while switching packets. This technology is used in the video games industry as well as high frequency trading in the financial industry, but not very prevalent in the networking industry yet. The biggest exception is CloudFlare, the CDN that optimizes website delivery by blocking DOS attacks.

Snabb Switch rides the wave of the vast improvements in hardware performance on x86 servers and NICs. In a nutshell, networking applications on Linux have been moved out of the kernel and into user space. It used to be that each packet arriving from the network to the NIC of an x86-based Linux server would be sent up to the kernel, which would then have to wake up, via an Interrupt signal, and process them before sending them out on the network. This was a very time-consuming process and it also made it very difficult for application developers to write networking code because it involved intricate knowledge of the kernel. However, with faster hardware, developers realized that with so many packets arriving each microsecond, waking up the kernel to process each packet was too inefficient. Instead, it became more prudent to assume a continuous stream of packets and setting aside a dedicated pool of memory for this traffic. In other words, the NIC is mapped directly with the memory of the user process. Snabb Switch does this by writing their own driver for the NIC (Intel NICs for now) that drives features such as an embedded Ethernet switch and QoS on around 850 lines of Lua code.

Generally speaking, people with networking backgrounds have traditionally assumed x86-based servers to be limited in their packet-processing capabilities (attributed to PCI bus bottlenecks, slow memory, slow CPU, etc). In reality, the raw performance that can be extracted from x86-based hardware is quite high. 800 Gbps can be attained from DRAM banks, 600 Gbps can be attained from PCI Express, and the interconnect between CPUs is also hundreds of Gbps. There is no reason one cannot attain 500 Gbps using a dual core Xeon server. The bottleneck is quite clearly the software. Of course this works best (10 million packets per second per core) for simple cases such as just sending packets in and out. But for slightly more complicated scenarios, such as accessing an unpredictable address in memory, performance can drop by an order of magnitude.

Snabb Switch is known to have generated 200 Gbps out of a single core at just 10% CPU utilization, which is quite incredible. The way that Gorrie did this is by reading in 32,000 packets into a PCAP file, pushing them out on 20 10G NICs, and programming those ports to run in a loop.

The outcome of Snabb Switch is quite similar to Intel’s DPDK, in which there is user space-based forwarding, no Kernel interrupts, and CPUs are dedicated to particular NICs. However, Snabb Switch is a lightweight platform for ground up designs, whereas DPDK is intended to allow developers, who have written applications that run inside the kernel, to port their mature code to user space. For newer application designs, user space development is more prevalent because of the higher traffic levels and performance expectations. Snabb Switch modus operandi is to poll the kernel for new packets to process rather than interrupting it. It runs a scheduler in a polling loop with multiple parallel traffic processes on separate CPUs.

Snabb Switch can also run as a high performance NFV switch for OpenStack environments. The way it can do this is by removing the kernel from the forwarding path and allowing the user space program to talk directly to the device driver on the guest VM. The VMs are only able to address their own memory that they have allocated themselves. A software switch cannot allocate memory to a VM. Instead, for each VM, a separate TX/RX queue in hardware is provisioned in the NIC. So when a VM gives a buffer for packets, the buffer is translated from a standard virtio format (in KVM) directly to hardware format. In other words, when a packet comes in from the network, the NIC determines which VM should get it (typically by looking up the destination MAC address and VLAN ID), picks the appropriate hardware queue with memory that belongs to that VM, grabs a buffer and copies the data from the NIC to that VM. Since Snabb Switch acts as the translation engine between standard virtio and native hardware on the standard Intel NIC, there is no need to write or install a specific device driver for guest VMs to access the hardware.

I believe that Snabb Switch has a lot of promise though it may take a while for deployments to be more mainstream.

Deconstructing Big Switch Networks at NFD8

I recently caught up with the presentation made by Big Switch Networks at Networking Field Day 8.

Founder Kyle Forster kicked things off with an introduction to Big Switch. He used the term ‘Hyperscale Data Centers’ to describe the data center of today and tomorrow that Big Switch targets. Big Switch has two products based on the following three principles:

  1. Bare metal switches for Hardware using Broadcom ASICs.
  2. Controller-based design for software
  3. Core-pod architecture replacing the traditional Core-Aggregation-Edge tier.

The two products are:

  1. Big Tap Monitoring Fabric – Taps for offline network monitoring
  2. Big Cloud Fabric – Clos switching fabric

Next up, CTO Rob Sherwood went into more detail. He defined the core-pod architecture as essentially a spine-leaf architecture where there are 16 pods (racks that have servers), at the top of which are two leaves. Each server is dual-connected to a leaf via 10G links. The leaves themselves connect up to spines via 40G links. The leaf switches are 48x10G and 6x40G for uplinks; the spine switches are 32x40G. So the maximum number of spine switches in a pod is 6. (In a leaf-spine fabric every leaf must connect to every spine). That also means a maximum of 32 leaves can connect to a spine. These numbers will definitely increase in future generations of switches when Broadcom can produce them at scale. This solution is targeted at Fortune 1000 companies, not really as much on smaller enterprises. Pods are very modular and can be replaced without disrupting the older network designs.

What I thought was pretty cool was the use of Open Network Installation Environment (ONIE) for provisioning. The switches get shipped to customers from Dell or Accton with a very lightweight OS, then as it turn on the box it netboots from the Controller (an ONIE server). Both Switch Light (which is the Big Switch OS), as well as the relevant configurations, get downloaded from the Controller to the switch. LLDP is used to auto-discover the links in the topology, and management software will tell if there are missing or double-connected links.

In the first demo, the Automated Fabric Visibility Tool was used to first allocate and assign roles in the topology. At that point, any errors in cabling would appear in the GUI, which was pretty user-friendly. The Big Cloud Fabric architecture has a dedicated OOB control/management network that connects to the Controller. Amongst the management primitives are a logical L2 segment (ala VLAN) that have logical ports and end-points, tenants that are logical grouping of L2/L3 networks, and logical routers that are the tenant routers for inter-segment or intra-segment routing. Each logical router corresponds to a VRF. VLAN tags can be mixed and matched and added into bridged domains. The use case would be analogous to a multi-tenant environment in each ESX instance, when you declare egress VLAN tags on vswitch in VMware deployments. You have the choice of specifying the tag as global fabric or local to the vswitch. Interestingly, Big Switch used to have an Overlay product two years ago and ended up tossing it away (because they feel they are L2 solutions only, not L3 solutions) to come up with the current solution because they believe it uses the hardware the way it was designed to be used.

The next demo was to create tenants, assign servers and VMs to logical segments by VLAN, physical ports, or port-groups to meet a use case of a common two-tier application.

The fabric in Big Cloud Fabric is analogous to a sheet metal chassis-based fabric that has fabric backplanes, line cards, and supervisors/management modules in that the spine switches are the backplanes, the leaf switches are the line cards, and the Controllers are the supervisors. The analogies actually don’t end with the components. Sherwood explained that traditional chassis switch vendors use proprietary protocols between their backplanes and their line cards that is actually Ethernet and is, therefore, no different from the OOB management network between spine switches and leaf switches. The control planes and the data planes in Big Cloud Fabric are completely decoupled so that in the event of the management switch completely going down, you only lose the ability to change and manage the network. So for example, if a new server comes up, routes for that host don’t get propagated. Of course, if both supervisors in a Nexus 7K go down, the whole switch stops working. If both Controllers go down simultaneously, the time needed to bring up a third Controller is about 5 minutes.

Big Cloud Fabric is based on OpenFlow with extensions. The white box switches that Big Switch sells have Broadcom ASICs that have several types of forwarding tables (programmable memory that can be populated). Some of the early implementations of OpenFlow only exposed the ACL table (which had only about 2000 entries), which didn’t scale well. The way Big Switch implements OpenFlow in Switch Light OS is to expose an L2 table and an L3 table, each with over 100,000 entries. They couldn’t go into more details as they were under NDA with Broadcom. Switch Light OS is Big Switch’s Indigo OpenFlow Agent running on Open Network Linux on x86 or ASIC-based hardware. Whereas traditional networks have clear L2/L3 boundaries in terms of devices, in Big Cloud Fabric L3 packets are routed on the first hop switch. If a tenant needs to talk to another tenant, packets go through a system router, which resides only on a spine switch.

Next up was Service Chaining and Network Functions Virtualization support. Service Chaining is implemented via next-hop forwarding. For example, at a policy level, if one VM or app needed to talk to another app, it could be passed through a service such as a load balancer or firewall (while leveraging the ECMP bits of the hardware) before reaching the destination. The demo showed how to create a policy and then, with a firewall service example, how to apply that policy, which is known as service insertion to an ECMP group. However, it is early days for this NFV use case and for more elaborate needs such as health monitoring, the recommendation is to use OpenStack. Interestingly, Big Switch integrates with OpenStack, but not VMware at this time (it is on the roadmap though).

Operational Simplicity was next on the agenda. Here Big Switch kicked off with the choice of control plane APIs to the user – CLI, GUI, or REST, which, generally speaking, would appeal to network engineers, vCenter administrators, and DevOps personnel respectively. High Availability is designed so that reactions to outages are localized as much as possible. For example, the loss of a spine only reduces capacity, the loss of a leaf is covered by the other leaf in the same rack (thanks to a dedicated link between the two) that has connections to the same servers (so the servers failover to the other leaf via LACP). The Hitless Upgrade process is truly hitless from an application perspective (a few milliseconds of data packets are lost) though capacity is reduced. A feature called Test Path shows the logical (at a policy level) as well as physical path a host takes to reach another host.

The final session was on the Network Monitoring features of Big Switch, namely Big Tap Monitoring Fabric. Sunit Chauhan, head of Product Marketing, said that the monitoring infrastructure is developed using the same bare metal switches that is managed from the same centralized controller. The goal is to monitor and tap every rack and ideally every vswitch. In a campus network that means the ability to filter traffic from all locations to the tools. The Big Tap Monitoring Controller is separate from the Big Cloud Fabric Controller and runs Switch Light OS as well. The example he gave was of a large mobile operator in Japan that needed thousands of taps. The only scalable (in terms of cost and performance) solution to to monitor such a network was to use bare metal Ethernet switches that report to a centralized SDN Controller.

The Big Tap Monitoring demo was based off a common design with a production network (which could be Big Cloud Fabric or traditional L2/L3 networks) with filter ports connected to a Big Tap Controller, which was then connected via delivery ports to the Tool Farm, where all the visibility tools existed.Of course Big Switch eats its own dogfood like every noble startup by deploying Big Tap Monitoring Fabric in its own office. They were able to capture the actual video stream of the NFD event that went out to the Internet from their office. Remote Data Center Monitoring is also supported now (though not demonstrable at NFD8), which reminded me of RSPAN except that this used L2-GRE tunnels.

A few afterthoughts: Big Switch used the marketing term ‘hyperscale data center’ like it was an industry standard and they gave examples of networks that were not hyperscale without explaining how they weren’t. In fact there was a slide that was dedicated to terminology used in a demo, but ‘hyperscale’ was not there. It reminded me of my days in a startup that used that same term in its marketing headlines without ever defining it.

From a personal perspective, in 2010 I worked as a Network Engineer in a large financial exchange where the Big Tap Monitoring Fabric would have been invaluable. Any time a trade was delayed by a couple of seconds resulted in potentially millions of dollars. The exchange would be spared that penalty if it could be proved that the delay was due to the application or the remote network and not the exchange’s own network. At that time we used network monitoring switches to determine where the delay occurred. But the location of those taps was critical. Moreover, it was just not scalable to have taps at every location off of every port. Since it was a reactive (troubleshooting) effort, it was really a Whac-a-Mole exercise. Ultimately, we went with a vendor that built the infrastructure to collect latency data from exchanges, and then offered the results to firms to allow them to monitor data and order execution latency on those markets. But it was expensive and those investments were between $10 and $15 million and ultimately that vendor went out of business. A solution like Big Tap Monitoring Fabric would have been a godsend. If Big Switch can figure out how to keep their costs down, they may have a huge opportunity in hand.

Tech Field Day events are intended to be very technical and this was no different. Slides with Gartner Magic Quadrants are usually met with rolling eyeballs, but I think Big Switch can be forgiven for having one reference to an industry analyst. Apparently according to Dell ‘Oro, in 2013 more ports were shipped from bare metal switches (from vendors such as Dell, Accton, and Quanta) that from Arista, Juniper, and Extreme combined!

While Big Cloud Fabric competes against the Cisco Nexus 7K product line, Big Tap Monitoring goes head to head against Gigamon. It was very refreshing to see a startup take on two behemoths, sheerly with clever engineering and nimble principles.

Deconstructing Nuage Networks at NFD8

I enjoy Tech Field Day events for the independence and sheer nerdiness that they bring out. Networking Field Day events are held twice a year. I had the privilege of presenting the demo for Infineta Systems at NFD3 and made it through unscathed. There is absolutely no room for ‘marketecture’. When you have sharp people like Ivan Pepeljnak of ipSpace fame and Greg Ferro of Packet Pushers fame questioning you across the protocol stack, you have to be on your toes.

I recently watched the videos for NFD8. This blog post is about the presentation made by Nuage Networks. As an Alcatel-Lucent venture, Nuage focuses on building an open SDN ecosystem based on best of breed. They had also presented last year at NFD6.

To recap what they do, Nuage’s key solution is Virtualized Services Platform (VSP), which is based on the following three virtualized components:

  • The Virtualized Services Directory (VSD) is a policy server for high level primitives from Cloud Services. It gets service policies from VMware, OpenStack, and CloudStack and also has a builtin business logic and analytics engine based on Hadoop.
  • The Virtualized Services Controller (VSC) is the control plane. It is based on ALU Service Router OS, which was originally developed 12-13 years ago and is deployed in 300,000 routers, now stripped to be relevant as an SDN Controller. The scope of Controller is a domain, but it can be extended to multiple domains or data centers via a BGP-MP federation, thereby supporting IP Mobility. A single availability domain has a single data center zone. High availability domains have two data center zones. A VSC is a 4-core VM with 4 GB memory. VSCs act as clients of BGP route reflectors in order to extend network services.
  • The Virtual Routing and Switching module (VRS) is the Data Path agent that does L2-L4 switching, routing, and policies. It integrates to VMware via ESXi, XEN via XAPI, and KVM via libvirt. The libvirt API exposes all the resources needed to manage the support of VMs. (As a side, you can see how it comes into play in this primer on OVS 1.4.0 installation I wrote a while back.) The VRS gets the full profile of the VM from the hypervisor and reports that to the VSC. The VSC then downloads the policy from the VSD and implements them. These could be L2 FIBs, L3 RIBs/ACLs, and/or L4 distributed firewall rules. For VMware, VRS is implemented as a VM with some hooks because ESXi has a limitation of 1M pps.

At NFD8, Nuage discussed a recent customer win that demonstrates its ability to segment clouds. The customer was a Canadian Cloud Service Provider (CSP), OVH, that has deployed 300,000 servers in its Canadian DCs. OVH’s customers can, as a beta service offering, launch their own clouds. In other words, it is akin to Cloud-as-a-Service with the Nuage SDN solution underneath. It’s like a wholesaler of cloud services whereby multiple CSPs could businesses could run their own OpenStack cloud without building it themselves. Every customer of this OVH offering would be running independent Nuage’s services. Pretty cool.

Next came some demos that address following 4 questions about SDN:

  1. Is proprietary HW needed? The short answer is NO. The demo showed how to achieve Hardware VTEP integration. In the early days of SDN, overlay gateways proved to be a challenge because they were needed to go from the NV domain to the IP domain. As a result VLANs needed to be manually configured between server-based SW gateways and the DC routers – a most cumbersome process. The Nuage solution solves that problem by speaking routing language, uses standard RFC 4797 (GRE encapsulation) on its dedicated TOR gateway to tunnel VXLAN to routers. As covered in NFD6, Nuage has three approaches to VTEP Gateways:
    1. Software-based – for small DCs with up to 10 Gbps
    2. White box-based – for larger DCs based on standard L2 OVSDB schema. In NFD8, two partner gateways were introduced – Arista and the HP 5930. Both feature L2 at this point only, but will get to L3 at some point.
    3. High performance-based (7850 VSG) – 1 Tbps L3 gateway using merchant silicon, and attaining L3 connectivity via MP-BGP
  2. How well can SDN scale?
    The Scaling and Performance demo explained how scaling in network virtualization is far more difficult than scaling in server virtualization. For example, the number of ACLs needed grows quadratically as the number of web servers or database servers increases linearly. The Nuage solution breaks down ACLs into abstractions or policies. I liken this to an Access Control Group, whereby ACLs fall under an Access Control Group. Another way of understanding this is Access Control Entries being part of an Access Control List (for example, an ACL for all web servers or an ACL for all database servers) so that the ACL is more manageable. Any time a new VM is added, it is a new ACE. So, policies are pushed, rather than individual Access Control Entries, which scales much better. Individual VMs are identified by tagging routes, which is accomplished by, you guessed it right, BGP communities (these Nuage folks sure love BGP!).
  3. Can it natively support any workload? The demo showed multiple workloads including containers in their natural environments without being VMs, i.e. bare metal. Nuage ran their scalability demo on AWS with 40 servers. But instead of VMs, they used Docker containers. Recently, there has been a lot of buzz around Linux containers, especially Docker. The advantage containers hold over VMs is that they have much lower overhead (by sharing certain portions of the host kernel and operating system instance), allow for only a single OS to be managed (albeit Linux on Linux), have better hardware utilization, and have quicker launch times than VMs. Scott Lowe has a good series of writeups on containers and Docker on his blog. Also, Greg Ferro has a pretty detailed first pass on Docker. Nuage CTO Dimitri Stiliadis explained how containers are changing the game as short-lived application workloads are becoming increasingly prevalent. The advantages that Docker brings, as he explained, is to move the processing to the data rather than the other way round. Whereas typically you’d see no more than 40-50 VMs on a physical server, the Nuage demo had 500 Docker container instances per server. So there were 20,000 container instances total. And they showed how to bring them up along with 7 ACLs per container instance (140K ACLs total) in just 8 minutes. That’s 50 containers or VMs per second! For reference, in the demo, they used an AWS c3.4xlarge instance (which has 30GB memory) for the VSD, a c3.2xlarge for the VSC, and 40 c3.xlarge instances for the ‘hypervisors’ where the VRS agents ran. The Nuage solution was able to successfully respond to the rapid and dynamic connectivity requirements of containers. Moreover, since the VRS agent is at the process level (instead of the host levels with VMs), it can implement policies at a very fine control. Really impressive demo.
  4. How easily can applications be designed?
    The Application Designer demo here showed how to bridge the gap between app developers, and infrastructure teams by means of high level policies to make application deployment really easy. In Packet Pushers Show 203, Martin Casado and Tim Hinrichs discussed their work in OpenStack Congress, which attempts to formalize policy-based networking so that a Policy Controller can abstract high level, human-readable primitives (which could be HIPAA, PCI, or SOX as an example), and express them in a language to an SDN Controller. Nuage confirmed that they contribute to Congress. The Nuage demo defined application tiers and showed how to deploy an WordPress container application along with a backend database in seconds. Another demo integrated OpenStack Neutron with extensions. You can create templates to have multiple instantiations of the applications. Another truly remarkable demo.

To summarize, the Nuage solution seems pretty solid and embraces open standards, not for the sake of lip service, but to solve actual customer problems.

A photo at Interop 2014

Interop 2014
This photo of me outside the Interop conference at the Mandalay Bay hotel in Las Vegas in front of a large screen display of my product , the HP 3800 Series switches, was taken by one of my customers.

I was at Interop at the Mandalay Bay hotel in Las Vegas last month to meet some customers when, to my pleasant surprise, I had noticed a large screen display on a wall outside the conference in the hotel dedicated to my product, the HP 3800 Series switches. This was outside the entrance to the conference, so anyone in the hotel could see it. I am very proud to say that I am the Global Product Manager for this product at HP. We recently introduced support on this product for two SDN applications – Network Protector and Network Optimizer for Microsoft Lync. You can find out more about the HP 3800 Series switches here.

Panel Discussion on Software Defined Infrastructure for OPEN Forum 2013

It has been a long time since I’ve posted a blog entry. In the meantime I have helped put together a SDN panel discussion for OPEN SV this Saturday, June 8th, 2013 at the Santa Clara Convention Center. I wrote a guest blog piece for OPEN SV here with a perspective on SDN and on the speakers.

It promises to be an exciting discussion. Just today, the moderator of the panel, Craig Matsumoto, who is the Editor of Light Reading covered Big Switch’s decision to pull back from its role in OpenDaylight. The panel discussion will also feature the VP of Engineering at Big Switch, Howie Xu. Rounding up the panel are Luis Robles, (VC at Sequoia), Awais Nemat (CEO of PLUMgrid), and Dominic Wilde (VP of Product Management at HP Networking).

If you’re in the San Francisco Bay Area, I highly recommend attending this panel. It is part of OPEN SV’s 10th annual OPEN Forum. More information on the panel itself is available here.